WRoCAH Journal - Issue 3


A Perceptual Dialect Map of Western Saudi Arabia

laila alhazmi, School of English, University of Sheffield lalhazmi1@sheffield.ac.uk Dialect Map Introduction Perceptual dialectology (PD) is a field of sociolinguistics, related to dialect geography.[1]  One of the main aims of PD is to investigate how non-linguists perceive regional varieties of specific areas and to map their perceptions of the ‘linguistic landscape.’[2]  Perceptual dialectology is concerned with the geographical distribution of dialects ...

Recuperation and the Ageing of the Avant-Garde

michael atkinson, School of Fine Art, Art History, and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds fh16mda@leeds.ac.uk Avant-Garde The avant-garde itself has been and remains subject to interpretation, criticism, and renewal; the accusation of ‘ageing’, levelled by Theodor W. Adorno against a specific area of the avant-garde in his 1955 essay ‘The Aging of the Avant-Garde’, is just one of those criticisms. ...

Faith Beyond Reason: Søren Kierkegaard’s Interpretation of the Biblical Patriarch Abraham

haroon bashir, School of Languages, Cultures and Societies, University of Leeds ll10mhb@leeds.ac.uk Faith beyond reason The story of the binding of Isaac, also known as the Aqedah, exists as one of the most well-known and discussed parables from the Hebrew Bible.[1]  It has had, and continues to have, great significance for all three Abrahamic faiths.  One of the most famous ...

Beyond Tonal Centricity: Residual Diatonicism in Carl Nielsen’s Fifth Symphony

OWEN BURTON, Department of Music, University of York ob703@york.ac.uk Beyond Tonal Centricity In 1922 the Danish composer Carl Nielsen (1865-1931) composed his Symphony No. 5.  This work contains a number of passages that are not in one clear musical key, that is to say such sections are apparently not tonal.  However, such passages still sound diatonic, meaning in simple terms ...

Passing Through the Pane: Genre, Art and Meta-textuality in Kim Ki-young’s The Housemaid

Robin Chapman, School of English, University of Sheffield rewchapman1@sheffield.ac.uk Passing Through the Pane Within his 1979 article ‘The Art Cinema as a Mode of Film Practice’ David Bordwell attempts to define and categorise art cinema as a ‘logically coherent mode of cinematic discourse’.[1]  Here he notes that specifically European films of the 1950s and 60s define themselves ‘against the classical ...

Gendering Peace in Europe, c.1918-1946: Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield, 20-21 January, 2017 Conference Report

  Liam liburd, Department of History, University of Sheffield ljliburd1@sheffield.ac.uk Gendering Peace During and after the First World War, men and women across Europe responded to the cataclysm of war by envisioning and struggling for peace.  Gendering Peace in Europe, c.1918-1946 brought together some sixty scholars from a range of disciplines and from across the globe to consider the ways ...

The Role of Kommos in Phoenician Routes

Judith Muñoz Sogas, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona) jmunozsogas1@sheffield.ac.uk Kommos 1. Introduction ‘Any Phoenicians sailing to the western Mediterranean would have been foolish to avoid the Aegean’ and especially the island of Crete [Fig. 1.1].[1]  Even though trade between Crete and other Mediterranean regions had already been established before the tenth century BC, it was ...

Forays Into a New Field: Experimental Science and the First Four Decades of the Royal Society

Joshua Scarlett, University of York, Science Museum (London) jas611@york.ac.uk Forays into a new field Introduction The Royal Society and its role in seventeenth and eighteenth century experimental philosophy has been the subject of intense scholarly debate since the early twentieth century.  Questions over the date of its foundation, over who was a member of the Society and what they achieved ...

‘Gesticulating Peanuts’: the introduction of theatre-in-the-round to 1950s British Theatre

rachel walker, School of English, University of Sheffield r.c.walker@sheffield.ac.uk Gesticulating Peanuts Stephen Joseph was a pioneer of theatre-in-the-round and was instrumental in progressing and democratising theatre in the UK; his name remains largely unknown, however, despite his wide-ranging influence on theatre architecture, playwriting and directing.  In this article, I will explore Joseph’s philosophy and how he furthered his aims of ...

Editorial

Editorial_ Third issue in and, once again, the journal is representative of the WRoCAH organisation it hopes to serve.  What does it represent?  Variety.  Or perhaps eclecticism would be a better word.  Within the obvious criteria of belonging to the arts and humanities, the extent of different ideas and subjects that are covered by WRoCAH students is boundless.  Before the ...